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How to prevent Photophobia, Heat headaches or Migraine Headache from Sunlight

If sunlight gives you a headache, you may be experiencing Photophobia. Take preventive steps to avoid migraine headaches.
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How to prevent Photophobia, Heat headaches or Migraine Headache from Sunlight
Most of us associate migraine with a headache, however indeed migraine is a neurological condition that is marked by various symptoms not only the headache but this may includes sensitivity of light, nausea, visual disturbances, and so on. By the way, sunlight being a trigger for migraine—so you are not alone if sunlight causes a headache for you. Truth be told, as numerous as 67% of individuals with migraines refer to exposure of bright light including sunlight as a trigger for attack, as indicated by annual “Migraine in America” survey. A few specialists have even claimed the light as more vulnerable trigger than diet or any hormonal changes. Research has shown that it can take just 5 to 10 minutes of being out in the sun to trigger a headache or migraine assault for the individuals who are prone for migraine attack.

If heat tends to trigger your headache or migraine, you can be proactive about prevention. If possible, limit your time outside on hot days, and protect your eyes with sunglasses and wear a hat with a brim when you venture out. Exercise indoors in an air-conditioned environment if you’re able to do so. Drink additional water as outside temperatures begin to rise.

Prevention

Steps to prevent headaches when enjoying warmer temperatures. These include:
drinking plenty of liquids throughout the day
avoiding excessive sun exposure
taking regular breaks in shaded areas
wearing polarized sunglasses
wearing fragrance-free sunscreen or other lotions
wearing a summer hat while going outside
avoiding exercise in extreme heat
continuing to eat meals on a normal schedule
taking medications according to the prescription
keeping medications at room temperature

Treatment

If a person has a headache, some self-care techniques may help reduce or eliminate the pain. These include:
taking a rest in a shaded area
using a cold pack or ice to help lower the body temperature
avoiding caffeinated beverages
waiting until it is cooler to exercise


Seek medical help right away if you have a heat-induced headache with any of the following symptoms:
nausea and vomiting
high fever (103.5 degrees or higher)
a sudden spike in pain levels or intense pain in your head
slurred speech, confusion, or disorientation
pale or clammy skin
extreme thirst or lack of appetite

If you don’t have emergency symptoms, but are getting headaches or migraines more than twice a week over a span of three months, schedule an appointment to speak with a doctor.

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